Quote of the Day

“I think those of us who are concerned about religious liberty have to fight to ensure that you don’t get this kind of aggressive tyranny of secularism, which I think is a very grave danger.

“And I think the real danger is you’ll see a drive to outlaw and limit Christianity. To say: It’s OK to be Christian as long as you’re not really Christian.”

Newt Gingrich, serial adulterer, who obviously himself is not really Christian.  The threat to his following his religion has never come from “the aggressive tyranny of secularism,” it’s come from inside his own pants.

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Quote of the Day

“One of the drawbacks of working in a bookstore, something I did for many years, is that it can be like working in a small-town pharmacy.  You learn things about people you might rather not know.  What sort of face do you put on when your new girlfriend’s mother comes to the counter with a Newt Gingrich novel, a scented candle and a copy of ‘The Herpes Survival Guide’?”

Dwight Garner, Books of the Times, NYT

You put on your gotta-find-a-new-girlfriend face.

Birds of a Feather

A couple of losers hanging out in Missouri — Newtie is going to campaign with Senate candidate Todd “Legitimate Rape” Akin next week.  Newt will do a joint press conference and a fundraiser with the crazy congressman.

Mrs. Newtie has another crappy children’s book out, so look for a book signing event and some poor bastard dressed in an “Ellis the Elephant” costume standing next to the bejewelled and helmet-haired Mrs. G.

Don’t Vote for the Narcissist

Frank Bruni has a wonderful column in today’s NYT, “A Shared State of Defeat,” about Newtie and Edwards:

“At one point toward the end of last week, as each of them mustered stoic faces for sorry fates, John Edwards and Newt Gingrich were only a few dozen miles apart.  Edwards sat mutely in a courtroom in Greensboro, N.C., where his breathtaking deceptions in the service of his towering ambitions were laid bare for the world, which watched raptly, but not in admiration.

“Gingrich shuffled pointlessly through a zoo in Asheboro, N.C., a peacock with faded plumage, still preening and still campaigning, though the attentions of most reporters and the affections of most voters had moved on.

“Beware the extreme narcissist.  Although he may radiate a seductive confident, he can justify and forgive himself for just about anything, given his belief in his own exalted purpose.  He’ll lose sense of the line between boldness and recklessness.

“What once drew so many people to Edwards and to Gingrich?  Both men had an exaggerated and infectious certainty about them. … It is the kind of thing that assuages a voter’s anxieties.

“It is also the kind of thing that arises from vanity on a scale well beyond the political norm.  Gingrich spoke of himself in ludicrously grandiose terms.  Edwards charted the size of his crowds and the volume of their applause the way a day trader watches the Dow.

“When you’re that wholly in thrall to your own heady promise, you exempt yourself from rules, absolve yourself of hypocrisy and persuade yourself that you’ll get away with it.  And so Gingrich, pressed for the impeachment of a philandering president despite his own continuing adultery, made his partner in adultery his third wife, and then preached traditional values with her on this arm.

“It was almost inevitable that he cheated:  someone as intent on affirmation as Gingrich — or Edwards — isn’t likely to remain content with the knowing gaze of a longtime spouse.  He needs the bedazzled expression of a fresh acolyte.

“Edwards commenced his lunatic dalliance with Rielle Hunter at his moment of greatest political possibility, not long after he’d been his party’s vice presidential nominee and shortly before he ramped up a new bid for the top of the ticket.

“And neither the affair’s exposure nor the birth of the couple’s child convinced him that his political career was done.  He got a slavishly loyal aide to claim to be the baby’s father.  As hard as it is to imagine such sycophancy, it’s harder still to imagine the hubris and entitlement of the leader who would request and be comfortable with it.”

We Pay While Newtie Runs Up Debt, Not Delegates

Newtie may not be accumulating delegates for the Tampa campaign, but he sure is accumulating debt.  His latest campaign filing to the Federal Election Commission shows debt of about $3 million.

I would also say he owes a moral debt to us taxpayers for costing us tens of thousands of dollars a day for Secret Service protection for a sham, failed campaign.  This is supposedly someone who cares passionately about wasted government spending.

I guess this is Newt’s new “Contract with America” — we’re stuck in a contract to pay for this delusional pompous ass to pretend to run for a nomination that Mitt already has.

Newt’s Phony Campaign Costing Taxpayers Real $

Conservative web site The Daily Caller is reporting that Newt’s Secret Service protection is costing taxing tens of thousands of dollars a day.  Back in 2008, Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan told a House subcommittee that candidate protection cost about $38,000 a day per candidate.

If we’re so outraged about the GSA Las Vegas junket, as we should be, why aren’t we outraged about this?