Sulzberger Preferred the Wrath of Women Than African Americans

Dean Baquet, who has replaced Jill Abramson as the executive editor at the NYT, told owner Arthur Sulzberger that Sulzberger had to choose between them.  If Sulzberger didn’t fire Abramson, Baquet, the first African American managing editor at the paper, would quit, claiming “humiliation” over the job offer to Janine Gibson, who was going to become co-managing editor for digital.

Sulzberger, knowing he had to face a firestorm over an African American or a woman, decided to fire the woman.  He may have rationalized his choice by telling himself that women aren’t really a “minority,” like African Americans.  But when it comes to getting jobs like executive editor of the Times, women sure as hell are a minority.

Advertisements

Quote of the Day

“But it is both a relief and a disappointment that the new [job] numbers offer some assurance that the long-reliable pattern of adding a bit more than two million jobs a year continues apace.  The 175,000 net jobs added in February extrapolate to a pace of 2.1 million jobs a year…. The jobs recovery in the United States is astonishingly consistent, astonishingly resilient and astonishingly underwhelming.”

Neil Irwin, NYT

Not So Fast!

As promised, President Obama signed an executive order today raising the minimum wage for employees of federal government contractors from $7.25 to $10.10 an hour.

But that increase won’t show up in actual paychecks any time soon.  First, the increase doesn’t even take effect until January 1, 2015.  Second, it will take three to five years to be fully implemented as contracts get renewed.

Quote of the Day

“I believe it’s immoral for this country to have as a policy extending long-term unemployment to people rather than us working on creation of jobs.”

Congressman Pete Sessions (R-Texas)

Um, Pete, this isn’t a case of “rather than” — you can, and should, do both. Because while you’re “working on” creating those jobs, people need to eat and pay their rent.

But the thing is, the GOP has shown no interest whatsoever in creating jobs because that might make the anti-Christ Obama look good and help the demon Dems in 2014.  Your party is interested only in making the economy as stalled and sluggish as possible, which means making as many American families as possible suffer.

There’s a word for that.  I believe it’s immoral.

One Vote, Just One Damn Vote

A three-month extension of unemployment benefits for 1.7 million of us failed today in the Senate by just one vote.  They had 59 votes, which is of course a majority, but because of the filibuster you need 60.

These four Republicans voted in favor:  Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire, Susan Collins of Maine, Dean Heller of Nevada, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska.

Unemployment Extension, RIP

The Senate defeated two proposals to extend unemployment benefits for the long-term unemployed in states with high unemployment rates.

A plan to extend benefits through November, paid for by extending the sequester, lost 52-48.

Another plan to extend benefits for just three months, without paying for it, lost 55-45.

It’s not just heartless, it’s makes no sense economically.  Aside from the families most directly affected, the whole country will suffer from reduced GDP and fewer jobs created this year.

With the need for 60 votes, the GOP might as well control the Senate as well as the House.

Don’t Give a Shit? There’s a GOP Talking Point for That.

GOP House leadership has given their rank and file talking points to try to justify their opposition to extending unemployment benefits without sounding dickish.

The talking points cite the “success” of ending emergency benefits in North Carolina last July, where the unemployment rate did, in fact, drop.  But that’s because people just gave up and stopped looking for work.  The labor participation rate in NC is the lowest it’s been in 37 years.

NC is actually a great talking point for Dems.