Fifty Shades of Sado-Monetarism

From “Another Bank Bailout,” Paul Krugman, NYT:

“Most notably, last week the European Central Bank declined to cut interest rates. This decision was widely expected, but that shouldn’t blind us to the fact that it was deeply bizarre. Unemployment in the euro area has soared, and all indications are that the Continent is entering a new recession. Meanwhile, inflation is slowing, and market expectations of future inflation have plunged. By any of the usual rules of monetary policy, the situation calls for aggressive rate cuts. But the central bank won’t move.

“And that doesn’t even take into account the growing risk of a euro crackup. For years Spain and other troubled European nations have been told that they can only recover through a combination of fiscal austerity and ‘internal devaluation,’ which basically means cutting wages. It’s now completely clear that this strategy can’t work unless there is strong growth and, yes, a moderate amount of inflation in the European ‘core,’ mainly Germany — which supplies an extra reason to keep interest rates low and print lots of money. But the central bank won’t move.

“Put all of this together and you get a picture of a European policy elite always ready to spring into action to defend the banks, but otherwise completely unwilling to admit that its policies are failing the people the economy is supposed to serve.

“Still, are we much better? America’s near-term outlook isn’t quite as dire as Europe’s, but the Federal Reserve’s own forecasts predict low inflation and very high unemployment for years to come — precisely the conditions under which the Fed should be leaping into action to boost the economy. But the Fed won’t move.

“What explains this trans-Atlantic paralysis in the face of an ongoing human and economic disaster? Politics is surely part of it — whatever they may say, Fed officials are clearly intimidated by warnings that any expansionary policy will be seen as coming to the rescue of President Obama. So, too, is a mentality that sees economic pain as somehow redeeming, a mentality that a British journalist once dubbed ‘sado-monetarism.’

“Whatever the deep roots of this paralysis, it’s becoming increasingly clear that it will take utter catastrophe to get any real policy action that goes beyond bank bailouts. But don’t despair: at the rate things are going, especially in Europe, utter catastrophe may be just around the corner.”  Emphasis added.

And that utter catastrophe may put Mitt in the White House.  Catastrophe squared!

5 comments on “Fifty Shades of Sado-Monetarism

  1. It hurts my brain to envision Romney in the White House and all his spore running around on the White House lawn playing touch football and pretending to be the Kennedys of Canelot.

    Aaaahhhhhhhhhhhgggggggggg!!!!!

  2. momshieb says:

    Krugman is the voice of reason. This is getting scarier every day. I hope to spend some of my time this summer working with Occupy Boston: at least they are out there speaking the truth!

    • I wish Krugman could be in charge of the economy for a couple of years. Ours and Europe’s!

      • momshieb says:

        But then someone would buy him, too, and it wouldn’t help.
        You’ll never convince me that the guys running the show don’t see these things.

      • I don’t think Krugman can be bought. The guys running the show know exactly what they’re doing and who is winning and who is losing by their actions. The country has turned into an oligarchy, the way Latin America was when I was growing up, and I smugly thought we were so superior.

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